The Quantum Repatterning Technique™

The Quantum Repatterning Technique™ (QRT) provides specific tools for identifying precisely what is taking place in the weakened or disordered physiology associated with unresponsiveness of the immune and endocrine systems.  In the chiropractic profession, it is recognized that all disease originates with a disturbance in the flow of innate communication.  When innate is inhibited or blocked, there are reactions that take place in the neuromuscular anatomy that result in a subluxation and an inhibition of nerve flow to a particular part of human anatomy.

Can you imagine having a fuller understanding of why adjustments hold or don’t hold and a more accurate description of how innate intelligence exerts its powerful influence on healing and repair mechanisms in the organism?  QRT was developed based on over three decades of research in brain proprioceptive feedback mechanisms, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and a wide array of kinesiological approaches.  In just a few minutes, one can identify the correct sequence of aberrant nervous/meridian system function in specific organs or systems of the body.

Most importantly, QRT accesses the body’s innate biofeedback communication system, providing an accurate tool for assessing the individualized pattern of functional disturbances and the underlying stressors that induce and promote illness.  By defining how and why an individual is stressed and providing the solutions to the negative health effects of these stressors, the QRT practitioner can nourish and energize the body on many levels.

Moreover, the understanding of muscle-organ proprioceptive blocks and vagal distress syndrome (VDS) can help chiropractors to improve patient outcomes, allowing innate intelligence to operate more fully in the human organism.  In the case of immunological unresponsiveness, once the immune stress overload has been identified, the application of appropriate therapy to immunodulate or support weak or deficient organs can be accomplished with simplicity and ease.

QRT is based on physiological and anatomical facts regarding specific viscerosomatic and somatovisceral relationships.  Where there is a specific dysfunction in an organ (say, the kidney), a specific related muscle group will test weak (in the case of the kidney, the left upper trapezius and the left psoas and illacus muscles will test weak and be sore upon palpation).  A muscle may test weak for a variety of reasons. (See Chart on page 50).

QRT offers a simple diagnostic tool that quickly unveils the core issues in immunological and hormonal unresponsiveness.  This unparalleled insight is based on empirical observations in the quantic domain of life, because complex, interwoven, energy fields govern our existence and determine how fast we will heal or recover from an illness, trauma, or an infection.  It is based on scientific evidence on electric conductivity, functional magnetic resonance imaging and infrared imaging.1-5

Unlike most alternative and traditional treatments that are often off-target and embarrassingly simplistic, QRT departs from fragmented, analytical thinking, and approaches the body with a variety of multileveled diagnostic and therapeutic avenues.  Many alternative practitioners may simply, unintentionally or otherwise, overlook the components of immunological or hormonal unresponsiveness in their attempt to direct therapy at, what may seem to be, more pressing clinical issues.

Clinically, there is a consistent association between accumulated toxins, oxidative stress levels, and blocked meridian energies that lead to a subluxation.  Clinical decisions—based on empirical observations and common sense inferences—lead to the obvious conclusion: The body’s neuro-energetic anatomy needs to be repatterned from the segmented interferences of stressors.  By repatterning each patient, the practitioner can “switch on” multiple energetic and metabolic pathways that give the patient more metabolic freedom and resiliency in today’s toxic environment and “switch off” pro-inflammatory pathways (Cox-2, Delta-5-desaturase) that give rise to carcinogenesis, pain and inflammation.

In summary, by allowing innate to tell us what is wrong, chiropractors will be in a stronger clinical position to help patients with complex and treatment-resistant disorders.6-14  Doctors, who want to learn how to adjust a vertebra with less force, need an acute pain relief procedure added to their present technique or who want better results than their present technique provides, will find the clinical application of QRT worthwhile.  QRT is reliable, reproducible, clinically-effective, and scientifically valid, as it is based on the scientific principles of cellular resonance and known facts of human physiology.1-4

Dr. Yanick is a world renowned expert on and founder of Quantum Medicine and QRT.  He has published extensively on Quantum Medicine.  You may contact Dr. Yanick by fax at 845-340-8606 or e-mail at [email protected].  Visit www.quantumenergy.com or www.aaqm.org for more information.

Serial Ports Are Going Away, and USB Is Here to Stay: Are You Ready?

Remember the good old days, when you used to plug your mouse into a serial port on the back of your computer, and IT DID NOT WORK? And when you finally loaded the right driver, you were SO HAPPY that it worked? And then you got REAL techno-geekish, and purchased a PDA (Palm Pilot) and/or digital camera and you REALLY found out how difficult serial ports were, since your PDA required the same serial port used by your mouse? Well, those days are over and so is the serial port. The serial port is rapidly going the way of the rotary dial phone, and is being replaced by the USB (Universal Serial Bus) port. What is really cool is that one USB port is capable of supporting many devices simultaneously, making it perfect for the technologically advanced doctors office.

 

Now here is the bad news: Virtually all chiropractic electronics devices (instrumentation including Range of Motion, Muscle Testing, SEMG and Thermography) utilize the serial port, leaving you totally stranded if you opt to purchase a newer computer (especially the lower cost computers). Serial ports still exist, but they are disappearing fast, so it is time to find a techno-solution.

 

A little background first: There are basically three ways to connect peripheral devices (such as cameras, chiropractic instrumentation, scanners etc.) to your computer: The serial port, USB port, and Firewire (also known as IEE1394) port. Some rare nut cases actually try to use the infrared ports, but anyone who has tried has found out how difficult that can be. There is also Bluetooth (which is a wireless standard), but it is not functional enough at this point to discuss. Parallel ports are disappearing along with serial ports.

 

USB is broken into USB 1.1 (low speed, used with mice or printers), and USB 2.0 (high speed, as is used with external hard drives and CD burners). USB 2.0 is rapidly becoming standard on new computers. Firewire (IEEE 1394) runs at about the same speed as USB 2.0, but is used mainly in digital video cameras and some hard drives only.

 

With chiropractic instrumentation typically outliving computers by many years, when you go to upgrade your computer, you’ll find that you simply cannot connect your instrumentation to your computer, leaving you without the essential instrumentation and clinical data every modern office relies upon.

 

How do you interface that ROM device, Muscle Tester, SEMG and Thermography devices to you computer when there are no serial ports?

 

One solution is to purchase “off the shelf” serial to USB converters for each of your serial devices. The problem is that they are typically “general purpose” converters, and are not designed to function with your specific instruments. I have found that they work around 80% of the time, which may be acceptable for some people.

 

As one who is easily frustrated, I gave up, and decided to design my own serial to USB converter. Customizing it to our specific needs provides significantly greater reliability. In addition, it is backwards compatible with all of our instruments going back to approximately 1991, and is truly “Plug & Play” on most operating systems, meaning there is little or no setup required.

 

The advantage of this solution is so great that, prior to purchasing ANY equipment in the next year, you should make certain that it is “designed for USB”. Note that marketing people are great at twisting the facts, and will try to claim that off-the-shelf USB to serial converters are built for their devices; so buyer beware, and ask several questions prior to purchasing any instrumentation any time in the future.

 

Questions to ask to determine if the product you are interested in is truly USB compatible:

1.  Does the device function or have a connection which works on a serial port? If the answer is, “Yes,” then you know that the device is a serial device, and the next few questions are very important ones.

2.  Will it function on a USB port at all?  If the answer is, “No,” be aware that you may have trouble connecting it to your computer, or a computer you purchase in the future. If the answer is, “Yes,” ask the following question:

3.  Does it use a serial to USB converter? If the answer is, “Yes,” ask:

4.  Does it use an “off the shelf” converter, such as a brand name model, which can be purchased online, or from a computer store? (Some brand names include Belkin, Keyspan, and Radio Shack) If the answer is, “Yes,” you may experience more difficulty with the product.

5.  Is the product designed to be used with USB without an off-the-shelf converter? If the answer is, “Yes,” this is the product you will most likely be happiest with.

 

Not only will the purchase of a product designed for USB be more reliable, easier to use, and protect your investment by interfacing to computers you may upgrade to in the future, but you can also purchase a less expensive computer. To put it into perspective, Dell now sells a notebook computer for $799.00 without a serial port. The least expensive model with a serial port costs $1199.00. What they are trying to communicate is, “We are getting rid of serial ports, so listen up!”

 

Technology can be your best friend or worst enemy. By finding the best product and support for your needs, you will have a great partner in building your practice.

 The author, David Marcarian, MA, is founder and president of Precision Biometrics, supplier of the MyoVision SEMG and Thermoglide systems. He has worked for NASA, and was awarded a $450,000 grant from the NIH for developing the MyoVision. He lectures for Palmer College of Chiropractic and his course is endorsed by all U.S. chiropractic associations that mandate SEMG training. He has personally instructed more than 6,000 chiropractors on proper SEMG use. Mr. Marcarian can be reached at 800-969-6961, by email at [email protected], or visit his company’swebsite at www.myovision.com.

An Occult Lesion of the Calcaneus

HISTORY

This active adolescent athlete sprained his foot while playing tennis.  Radiographs revealed a large radiolucent lesion in the calcaneus.  What is this?

DIAGNOSIS:  SIMPLE BONE CYST

The geographic lytic expansile lesion in the floor of the calcaneus is well circumscribed and has all the characteristic appearances of a benign lesion.  Benign lytic lesions of the calcaneus are most commonly simple bone cysts (unicameral); however, the possibility of an aneurysmal bone cyst, giant cell tumor, or other benign tumors cannot be ruled out. 

Figure 1. Observe the geographic lytic expansile lesion present in the floor of the calcaneus.GENERAL  CONSIDERATIONS

Simple bone cyst (SBC), sometimes referred to as a unicameral bone cyst (UBC), solitary bone cyst, or juvenile bone cyst, is not a true neoplasm of bone, but rather a fluid-filled cyst that is lined with a thin layer of fibrous tissue.  Nonetheless, it is frequently classified under the heading of primary bone tumors.  Jaffe and Lichtenstein1, who described the first cases in 1942, clearly delineated this cyst as a distinct disease entity, naming it unicameral bone cyst.  The term unicameral, meaning one house, has actually created some confusion, since many lesions present with a bubbly or chambered appearance; it is not single chambered at all.  All of the cases that Jaffe and Lichtenstein originally reported were of the single-chamber cystic variety, which led them to use the term unicameral initially.  However, many multichambered lesions have been reported since, which are better termed simple bone cysts rather than unicameral.  In fact, histologically, they are the same lesion.

INCIDENCE

SBC’s represent slightly more than 3% of biopsied primary bone tumors.2
An SBC most commonly occurs between the ages of 3 and 14 years (80% of cases).  They have been reported in a 2-month-old infant3, and in patients over 50.3  Males predominate, 2:1.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Most lesions are totally asymptomatic until a pathologic fracture occurs, not uncommonly in athletic activities.4,5  Approximately two-thirds of the SBC’s eventually undergo pathologic fracture.6

TREATMENT AND PROGNOSIS

The traditional treatment of choice has been surgical curettage with cauterization of the cyst.  Packing of the hollow cavity with bone chips following surgery is necessary.  However, recurrence rates with this technique have been high, approximately 30 to 40%.7   More recently, the injection of steroids has significantly reduced the recurrence rates, thus providing effective treatment for the cyst.5,8-11

Dr. Terry R. Yochum is a second-generation chiropractor and a cum laude graduate of the National College of Chiropractic, where he subsequently completed his radiology specialty.  He is currently Director of the Rocky Mountain Chiropractic Radiological Center, in Denver, CO, an Adjunct Professor of Radiology at the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, as well as an instructor of Skeletal Radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO.  Dr. Yochum is, also, a consultant to Health Care Manufacturing Company that offers a Stored Energy system.  For more information, Dr. Yochum can be reached  at: 303-940-9400 or by e-mail at [email protected].

Dr. Chad Maola is a 1999  Magna Cum Laude graduate of  National College of Chiropractic.

References

  1. Jaffe HL, Lichtenstein L:  Solitary unicameral bone cyst, with emphasis on the roentgen picture, the pathologic appearance and the pathogenesis. Arch Surg 44:104, 1942.
  2. Mirra JM:  Bone Tumors—Diagnosis and Treatment. Philadelphia, JB Lippincott, 1980.
  3. Jaffe HL:  Tumors and Tumorous Conditions of the Bones and Joints, Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1958.
  4. Garceau GJ, Gregory CF:  Solitary unicameral bone cyst. J Bone Joint Surg (Am) 36:267, 1954.
  5. Rowe LJ, Brandt JR:  Simple bone cysts in athletes. Chiro Sports Med 2:33, 1988.
  6. Wilner D:  Radiology of Bone Tumors and Allied Disorders, Philadelphia, WB Saunders, 1982.
  7. Smith RW, Smith CF: Solitary unicameral bone cyst of the calcaneus. J Bone Joint Surg (Am) 56:49, 1974.
  8. Capanna R, Albisinni U, Campanacci M, et al: Contrast examination as a prognostic factor in the treatment of solitary bone cyst by cortisone injection. Skeletal Radiol 12:97, 1984.
  9. Capanna R, DalMonte A, Campanacci M: The natural history of unicameral bone cyst after steroid injection. Clin Orthop 166:204, 1982.
  10. Scaglietti O, Marchetti PG, Bartolozzi P: Final results obtained in the treatment of bone cysts with methylprednisolone acetate (depo-medral) and a discussion of results achieved in other bone lesions. Clin Orthop 165:33, 1982.
  11. Yochum TR, Rowe LJ:  Essentials of Skeletal Radiology, ed. 2. Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1996.

Chiropractic News Around the World

Allstate, Liberty Mutual File $1M Lawsuit in Alleged Fraud Scam

KENTUCKY:  June 26, 2003, Allstate Insurance Company and Liberty Mutual Group announced they jointly filed a federal RICO lawsuit against a Kentucky doctor and owners of several medical clinics and billing companies in that state.
The lawsuit seeks a declaration in regard to reimbursement of more than $1 million dollars for payments issued on behalf of policyholders by Allstate and Liberty Mutual Group companies, including Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Employers Insurance of Wausau and Indiana Insurance Company.
Allstate and Liberty Mutual allege that the defendants formed and operated several medical clinics and billing companies in which excessive and unnecessary MRI’s and nerve tests were ordered.  The suit contends that the defendants billed for those excessive medical tests and for services not rendered.  The lawsuit also alleges the clinics and several mobile diagnostic operations established illegal fee-splitting agreements.  The suit currently involves more than 900 Allstate personal injury protection claims, and 300 Liberty Mutual, Wausau and Indiana claims for personal injury protection, workers’ compensation and bodily injury.
www.insurancejournal.com

 

Chiropractor Penalized for Narcotics Problems

ILLINOIS:  An investigation of a Rockford weight-loss clinic has come to a close, several years after the state accused the clinic of improperly buying and distributing narcotics for profit.
David Girgenti, a chiropractor, settled the case with the state in February.  His chiropractic license was revoked for 45 days, from Feb. 20 to April 6.  He was placed on a 30-month probation through Sept. 6, 2005.  He also was fined $15,000.
Girgenti allegedly “did not properly supervise his staff in the purchase of medicine and supplies for the clinic,” according to the settlement.  Seven doctors employed by Girgenti were also disciplined. 
Girgenti said his employees were responsible for the narcotics troubles.
“I was on the tail end of this,” he said. “There were very specific protocols they were to follow for the ordering and storing of drugs.  They didn’t follow protocol.”

 

Chiropractor Pleads Guilty in Patient-death Case

PENNSYLVANIA:  Joanne M. Gallagher, DC, who practiced for close to 20 years in Hazleton, PA, was convicted of insurance fraud in connection with the death of a 30-year-old epileptic woman whom she treated with cranial therapy.  Court documents indicated that the patient died of severe seizures after she followed Gallagher’s advice to stop taking her anticonvulsive medication.  The fraud involved submitting insurance claims falsely describing “meningeal balancing” as spinal manipulation.  After learning that her fatal advice had been tape-recorded, Gallagher pled guilty to one count of mail fraud under an agreement that she surrender her chiropractic license in 45 days and agree not to resume practice unless cleared to do so by a federal court judge.  Sentencing is expected to take place in September.  The crime carries a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
www.Phillyburbs.com

Animal Rights Group Harassing Palmer Colleges

FLORIDA:  Bea Arthur, the star of “Golden Girls” and “Maude,”  has joined an animal rights organization in criticizing Palmer Chiropractic University System’s animal research.
The actress recently left taped telephone messages for dozens of employees at three Palmer campuses.  She claimed that the Davenport, Iowa-based Palmer “mutilates” cats and asked its employees to oppose the school’s chiropractic research, according to the Associated Press.  She made the calls on behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.
PETA’s Web site urges supporters to contact Palmer officials.  Employees at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida said PETA’s campaign has led to dozens of “abusive” letters, e-mail messages and phone calls, the AP reports.
“It’s outrageous. (PETA) encourages people to call and harass us,” Palmer spokesman Randy Heuston said.  “They have placed their philosophy of animal rights above medical, chiropractic health care progress.”
Chiro Wire

Are you sure that new patient isn’t part of a “sting” operation?

TEXAS:  A Jasper, Texas, chiropractor is facing felony charges following an undercover “sting” operation conducted by Texas Mutual Insurance Company.  On July 15, 2003, a Travis County grand jury indicted Dr. Michael T. Fleck, owner of East Texas Chiropractic, on insurance fraud-related charges.
Investigators affiliated with the Texas Mutual Insurance Co. began reviewing Dr. Fleck’s billing practices after learning that he had taken several patients off work after other doctors had already released them to return to work.  In some cases, Dr. Fleck allegedly refused to return patients to work even when they said they were pain-free and able to return to work.  The investigation also revealed that Dr. Fleck allegedly charged unusually large amounts for so-called “aquatic therapy.”
A workers’ compensation specialist assisted the investigators by posing as an injured worker.  Dr. Fleck treated him for several weeks, and the investigators documented it, minute by minute.  Later, the investigators contrasted the treatment Dr. Fleck delivered with the bills he submitted for the treatment.  Their findings allege that Dr. Fleck fraudulently billed Texas Mutual Insurance Company for services not rendered and for services to which he was not entitled payment.
The Fleck investigation is part of Texas Mutual’s “Zero Tolerance for Fraud” program.  Texas Mutual maintains three teams of fraud investigators permanently assigned to investigate every report of suspected fraud.
www.insurancejournal.com

Life and CCE Bury the Hatchet!?

GEORGIA:  Life University, the nation’s largest chiropractic school, graduated about 300 students on Sunday, June 15, u u2003, a year after the Council on Chiropractic Education pulled the university’s accreditation, reports The Atlanta Journal and Constitution.
After the university learned it would take a minimum of two years to restore its credentials, the school sued the Council for more than $100 million in damages.  A federal court restored Life’s accreditation in February until the lawsuit could be resolved, an order which the CCE appealed.
But, wait!  Life and the CCE have buried the hatchet.  An official news release issued jointly by the two entities states that Life’s current accredited status will remain in effect and provides for a special accreditation process that is scheduled to be completed by the University by the end of January 2005.
Chiro Wire

D’Youville College to Offer Chiropractic Program

New York:  In what many consider a ground breaking move in healthcare education, D’Youville College has announced it will be offering a Doctor of Chiropractic program beginning in 2004.
D’Youville will be the first standard accredited multi-disciplinary college in New York State to “mainstream” chiropractic education by offering the Doctor of Chiropractic degree and only the second college in the country to do so. (The University of Bridgeport in Connecticut started their program in 1990.) Canada, a major source of students for D’Youville, has only one school of chiropractic.
The State Education Department approved the program in June and D’Youville is now actively recruiting freshmen students.
Previously, students interested in the chiropractic profession had to attend one of 16 single purpose institutions nationwide primarily dedicated to chiropractic education. Now, with D’Youville entering the field, a student will take liberal arts and science courses required for an undergraduate degree with students from other health-related disciplines and then embark on professional level evidence-based chiropractic studies.
[email protected]

U.S. House of Representatives Demands Veterans Affairs Department Hire DC’s

VIRGINIA:  The House of Representatives has formally ordered the Department of Veterans Affairs to speed up the implementation of chiropractic services into the veterans health care system—a requirement that was passed into law in 1999 but has since been delayed by bureaucratic foot dragging.  The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and the Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC) strongly supported the measure and have been working closely with a bipartisan coalition of key legislators to ensure its passage.
The bill, known as the “Veterans Health Care Improvement Act (HR 2357),” was passed by voice vote on Monday, July 21.  Championed by Rep. Jerry Moran (R-KS) and Rep. Rob Simmons (R-CT), Chairman of the Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Health, it contains a provision instructing the VA to hire and employ doctors of chiropractic.  Legislation passed in 1999 (P.L. 106-117) required the VA to develop a plan for offering chiropractic care, but the new bill goes a step further and eliminates the remaining bureaucratic obstacles that have prevented the formal establishment of chiropractic clinical care in the VA.

Chiropractor Sentenced to Five Years in Prison for Fraud

FLORIDA:  A chiropractor that once ran for City Council will spend more than five years in prison for his part in a million-dollar health care fraud scheme.
Russell Posner was sentenced in late June to 63 months in prison.  He must pay $782,188 in restitution and undergo mental health and substance abuse evaluation and treatment.
He pleaded guilty in February to making false claims to Medicare, conspiring to defraud the Social Security Administration and racketeering.
“He basically plead to protect his family from having to go through a trial,” Posner’s attorney said.  “He has young kids, and he wanted to minimize the harm to them.”
For years, Posner headed a storefront office on Pine Island Road, posing as a $6-an-hour clerk too arthritic to work as a chiropractor, prosecutors have said.
In reality, prosecutors said, he wrote prescriptions, passed out pills, and helped others mastermind ways to cheat public and private insurance companies with phony claims.
South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News.

WV Chiropractors Lead Country in Worker’s Compensation Payments

WEST VIRGINIA:  State lawmakers are working to maintain funding for the worker’s compensation system—and chiropractors should be rooting for them all the way.
Chiropractors who live in southern West Virginia make more from worker’s compensation payments than their colleagues in other parts of the country, according to the Charleston  Gazette-Mail.  And if the state legislature cuts back on the system, that could mean a sizeable pay decrease for chiropractors.
Overall, physicians of all specialties from the South made more from worker’s compensation payments than their counterparts elsewhere.  Most of the 20 individual physicians who received payments between 1998 and 2002 that ranged from $857,598 to approximately $2.6 million came from southern counties.
Ten of the top dozen chiropractic centers for worker’s compensation reimbursements were located in or around the West Virginia counties of Nicholas, Mercer and Wayne.  Four chiropractic clinics received more than $2 million during the past five years.
Chiro Wire TAC

Getting the (Rehab) Job Done

A large percentage of patients don’t perform the home-based rehabilitative exercises that are recommended to them.1  Even though you spend precious time deciding which exercises will be helpful and explaining them to the patient, your experience has probably been the same as most chiropractors:  Too many patients just can’t seem to do their exercises.  And yet, you know that if they would just do the exercises, they would get better faster.  Patient cooperation and satisfaction with at-home exercise programs are important for successful outcomes.2

Getting the (Rehab) Job Done

In my opinion, each patient has several barriers or “hurdles” to get over in order to reach the goal of exercising.  The more hurdles we can lower or even eliminate, the more likely it is that the exercises will get done.  Here are some ways to lower the hurdles and help your patients get to the “‘finish line.”

Small Beginnings

Lower the first big hurdle by recommending only one (or, at most, two) exercise(s) initially.  This minimizes the start-up effort and decreases the amount of time required.  Once a patient has been doing one or two exercises regularly for a couple of weeks, additional or more complex exercises can be more easily implemented.

Consistency for Success

Consistency helps to ensure success in many areas.  When a new habit needs to be learned, frequent and regular repetition helps.3  Trying to schedule exercises into a busy schedule is difficult, especially when your patient has to decide which days to exercise and which days to rest.  Since rehabilitative exercises do not tear down muscles, daily exercising is safe, and the scheduling hurdle can be eliminated.  Instruct your patients to “do the exercises every day.”

Why, What, and How

Make sure your patient knows why the exercise needs to be done, and what benefits to expect.  Motivation improves compliance with exercise.4  Motivation is much better when a purpose is understood and a mutual goal has been established.  Explain that doing the exercise will help your patient better perform the activities he or she enjoys.

Simple Is Best

Keep instructions to patients clear and simple.  This is particularly important when discussing the numbers of repetitions and “sets” (groups of repetitions).  Many doctors recommend six repetitions of the exercise, followed by a brief (up to one minute) rest, done three times.  This “three sets of six” concept is quick to perform and easy to understand.  Recent research has shown that only one set of ten-to-twelve repetitions can be just as effective.  This is particularly true when patients are just starting to exercise, and especially when they are exercising daily.  Use either approach, but keep the instructions clear.

Using the “Whenever” Approach

Any time of day is the right time to exercise—what’s most important is getting the exercises done.  Even though some professionals feel that athletic activities are somewhat safer in the afternoon (when muscles and joints are warmer), encourage your patients to exercise whenever it works for their schedule (and once a day is plenty). 

Utilize Allies

A spouse or family member should accompany the patient when exercises are taught, so they can help ensure correct and regular performance of the exercise.  A second person who wants your patient to get better can be a tremendous ally,1 one who will provide encouragement and reminders.

Focus on Function

Focus your patients on function by keeping them off the floor.  Exercising in a weight-bearing position is actually easier for patients.  In addition to being more focused and practical, upright exercising trains and strengthens the spine to perform better in everyday activities.  Patients like the idea of doing an exercise that clearly prepares them for better function during normal activities of daily life.  

Provide Demonstration

Demonstrate, then watch and correct your patients’ performance of the exercise.  When patients need an exercise, they usually can’t do the exercise correctly.  Diagrams, pictures, even videos can’t ensure that patients will be able to figure out the suggested exercise.  When you spend the time to show them the exercise, and then you guide them through it, they realize that you believe this is an important part of their treatment.  Patients are then much more likely to do the exercise.1

Keep it Easy

Well-designed, easy-to-use home rehab equipment helps to ensure compliance.5  Home equipment should be easy to figure out and set up, and should help guide your patients through the necessary exercises.

Monitor and Praise

As an integral part of their rehab while under your care, all patients must record their exercising in some form of exercise log.  This allows them to “give themselves a pat on the back” each time they do the exercise.  And remind them to bring the exercise log with them to every adjustment, so you can see how the exercises are going.  Make sure to give them praise and recognition for the exercises they perform.

Rehab Review

At least once a week, have the patient perform their exercise in front of you.  This allows you to confirm that it’s being done properly, and you can correct any faults that creep in.  A regular review also reinforces, in the patient’s mind, the importance of the exercising and encourages them to continue.

Aim for a Rapid Response

There is nothing more motivating than the feeling that the most important exercises are being done.  Make sure that the exercise(s) you are recommending will produce a rapid response, so the patient starts to feel the benefits of the exercising immediately.  Don’t give all patients the same six exercises; instead, try to start the patient on the most important exercise for his or her condition.1

Gradual Development

If you implement these rehab tips, your patients will be more likely to do their exercises faithfully.  Once they have established the habit of doing one or two exercises, you can use the rehab review to add other exercises.  With this method, a patient can gradually develop a good general fitness and spinal health exercise program while under your care.

Word will soon get around your community that you care enough about your patients to help them establish a regular spinal health and exercise program.  This will build your practice, and also improve the reputation of chiropractic for years to come.

Kim D. Christensen, DC, CCSP, CSCS, DACRB, founded the SportsMedicine & Rehab Clinics of Washington.  He is a popular speaker, and participates as a team physician and consultant to high school and university athletic programs.  Dr. Christensen is currently a postgraduate faculty member of numerous chiropractic colleges and is the president of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) Rehab Council.  He is a “Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist,” certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association.  Dr. Christensen is the author of numerous publications and texts on musculoskeletal rehabilitation and nutrition.  He can be reached at Chiropractic Rehabilitation Consulting, 18604 NW 64th Avenue, Ridgefield, WA 98642 or by email at [email protected].

References

  1. Kamiya A, Ohsawa I, et al. A clinical survey on the compliance of exercise therapy for diabetic outpatients. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1995; 27(2):141-145.
  2. Chen CY, Neufeld PS, et al. Factors influencing compliance with home exercise programs among patients with upper-extremity impairment. Am J Occup Ther 1999; 53(2):171-180.
  3. Rejeski WJ, Brawley LR, et al. Compliance to exercise therapy in older participants with knee osteoarthritis: implications for treating disability. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997; 29(8):977-985.
  4. Friedrich M, Gittler G, et al. Combined exercise and motivation program: effect on the compliance and level of disability of patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1998; 79(5):475-487.
  5. Stenstrom CH, Arge B, Sundbom A. Home exercise and compliance in inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a prospective clinical trial. J Rheumatol 1997; 24(3):4700-476.

Million Dollar Chiropractic Interview with Dr. Steve Querio

Dr. Steve Querio’s M$C Profile

PERSONAL:
Married to wife, Lisa for 5 years and has 3 children; Nikki, age 10; Luke, age 3; and Emily, age 1 1/2.
Recreation and Leisure:  I enjoy spending time with my kids.  I also enjoy traveling and watching Green Bay Packer football. 
Professional Affiliations: Wisconsin Chiropractic Assn., American Chiropractic Assn., Green Bay Chamber of Commerce
Seminar Attendance:  Wisconsin Chiropractic Assn. license renewal seminars; Breakthrough Coaching seminars & various other seminars
Vacations:  I have been trying to take more time off in the form of extended weekends and love to travel to warmer climates in the winter.

PRACTICE PARTICULARS
Clinic:
  We are located across the street from a hospital.  We utilize 9000 sq. ft., which is an entire floor of a 5-story medical office building.  We are quickly running out of room.
Office Hours:   Our chiropractic division is open  8 A.M. to 6 P.M., Monday, Wednesday &  Friday; Tuesday and Thursday, 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.  Our medical division is open 7 A.M. to 7 P.M., Monday through Friday and 8 A.M. to 1 P.M., Sat. & Sun.
Techniques:  Gonstead & Diversified
Staff:  Dr. Querio’s office employs approximately 30 employees.  The professional staff includes 2 D.C.’s, 2 M.D.’s & 1 P.A. in the urgent care, 1 occupational M.D., 1 P.T., 1 P.T.A., 1 massage therapist, a nursing staff, and a lab and X-ray staff.  The office also has administrative staff in management, reception and billing.

M$C: What influenced you to become a chiropractor?
Querio:  As with a lot of chiropractors, I have a story to tell.  I was about thirteen years old and I injured my low back.  I had always been interested in the sciences as long as I could remember.  So, I knew that I would eventually be in some type of health care field.  Following my injury, I visited a local chiropractor, Dr. Gerry Abbeglen, who did a fantastic job and later got me interested in chiropractic.  The rest is history!

M$C: What type of practice do you have?
Querio:  My practice life has been an interesting and exciting experience.  I began my chiropractic career without the incorporation of any physical therapy procedures.  Over time, as I slowly used some various rehab, I experienced the great benefit that the combination of adjusting and rehabilitation has had with my patients.  So, I continued to advance my practice. 
I started by adding massage and physical therapy.  After some time, I decided to bring a medical physician into the practice.  Two friends, Dean Lois, M.D., and Dave Andrews, P.A.-C, and I recently had an opportunity to create a new company by taking over a medical facility and adding chiropractic and physical therapy to it.  This combined facility began March 1, 2003, and we are having a great time.  My partners direct the medical division and I direct the chiropractic and physical therapy divisions.  I can’t say that every step in this conversion has been an easy task.  We’ve had to handle a number of difficult starting issues such as the overall merger of our staffs, combining two different software systems, and changing a large number of procedures.  We use a professional coach who has helped us a great deal in making this a smooth process. 
It was an eye opening experience for me with the different types of issues that a medical facility faces as compared to a chiropractic office.  In one aspect, our facilities are quite different in that medical clinics treat a variety of conditions that don’t typically walk into a chiropractic clinic.  But, on the other hand, we’re similar in that we all try to provide great care and all have the same business concerns.
As far as our practice mix, we are presently trying to develop our chiropractic, occupational and physical medicine, and physical therapy areas.  I partnered with a company that specializes in u u working with multidisciplinary practices to bolster our occupational medicine area.  We also have a mix of reimbursements that range from general insurance, managed care, company contracts, and cash.

M$C: Please describe the size, lo-cation and physical appearance of your practice facility. 
Querio:  Our clinic is located on a fairly busy street in Green Bay.  We are in a medical office building, across the street from a local hospital, and are in a small medical area in the city.  We presently utilize 9000 sq. ft., but would really like to grow into approximately 12-15,000 sq. ft. by next year.  Green Bay is a city of approximately 100,000 people.  Brown County has a population of about 250,000.

M$C: What’s the income service   level that you provide annually?
Querio:  When we took over the medical facility and added the chiropractic and physical therapy, we had to rethink the numbers because we made so many changes.  We cut over $700,000/year in expenses!  We’ve been running the new facility for approximately four months now, and we have been fairly consistent with what we thought we would produce in service.  We certainly have qualified for this article series and hope to have tremendous growth in the future.
M$C: Do you have a margin formula or set profit standard for the business?
Querio:
  I think one of the most important things you can do in a practice is to track the office statistics.  We try to monitor various stats so we always know what direction the practice is going.  Some of these statistics include number of new patients, patient visits, performance of staff, financial stats, etc. 
Some of the standard formulas that we set as goals include collections, where we feel that our practice should be at approximately 80% of services; our Accounts Receivable should not be greater than 2.5 times our monthly services; and we want to keep our cancellation/reschedules below approximately 13%.  Due to the fact that we now have urgent medical care in our clinic where patients may come in for one visit, this significantly alters our previous patient visit average for the overall clinic, so we are coming up with some new numbers.

M$C: Do you have someone to whom you attribute your success?
Querio:  Without question, I attribute my work ethic and determination to my parents.  I grew up in a middle class family and they always taught me the value of hard work.  They always encouraged me to never give up.  Over time, now, I’ve learned that working smart is just as important as working hard. 
I learned a great part of my technique from Larry Troxell, DC.  I certainly consider my present mentor to be Mark Sanna, DC.  He has incredible vision and is taking Breakthrough Coaching to the forefront of the chiropractic profession.  I must also acknowledge my coach, Charlie Schuster, DC, who has helped me through this massive transition of practice.  I am surprised he has an ear left after all of the phone calls I’ve made!

M$C: Tell us about your family.
Querio:
  I have been married to my wife, Lisa, for five years.  I have three great kids; Nikki, Luke and Emily.  Nikki is the social butterfly and I’m sure she’ll be on Star Search someday.  Luke is my “shadow” and goes wherever I go.  He’s very strong willed.  Emily is my little princess. 

M$C: What marketing strategies do you use to attract new patients and to keep current patients?
Querio:
  I have always felt that a combination of internal and external marketing was necessary.  However, I feel that you must always start with internal marketing and plan your external marketing off that.  With that said, our clinic has mainly used patient and professional referrals as a source of our new patients.  We have added a fulltime director of sales and marketing, which has helped greatly.  She mainly works with the occupational area, but we have been having very good success with this.  Marketing is really a relationship game.
As far as keeping the patients we have…I think that if you give patients service that exceeds their expectations, they’ll be patients for life.

M$C: Obviously, every doctor, at some time or other in his practice, experiences problems with patient retention.  How do you handle such problems? 
Querio:
  I think that patient retention starts on Day One.  The patient has to feel comfortable with you and your staff.  I also feel a good report of findings is essential.  I tell it like it is, good or bad.  I’ve never been the type to pressure the patient into care.  I’ve just given good reports of findings and the patients usually understand the need for the care.  When the patient makes the decision to complete a plan of treatment, they will usually follow through.  If they start to fall from care, it’s important that you talk to them about it immediately.
 
M$C: We all know that an efficient staff is a crucial com-ponent of a successful practice.  Tell us about your staff  (How  u you find them, train them, what qualities you look for).
Querio:  As everyone reading this knows, a staff can make or break a practice.  I’ve found that I would much rather hire someone who has a positive personality and passion over knowledge.  I can teach anyone anything; but I can’t teach someone how to have passion or how to be friendly to people.  You either have it or you don’t. 
Unfortunately, in this practice transition, my partners and I have had to make some tough decisions and release a lot of employees.  It never is a fun thing to do, but, if you want a successful practice, you must have the right team in place.  I’ve also learned that keeping a staff member on the payroll when you know they should be released is a huge mistake.  Poor staff members are a slow cancer in a practice.  Get rid of them.  Take it from me, I’ve made (and learned from) every mistake in the book.
I feel that the staff we have now is the “right team”.  We are all working well together and we can see the positive effects of it.  They are working really hard and no practice runs well without a good staff.

M$C: Do you en-joy your work?  How do you feel about going to work in the morning?  
Querio:  I am very fortunate to have two great partners.  We all have our different strengths and work great together.  They were chiropractic patients prior to our partnership, too.  It’s been very exciting to start this new venture and, although it has been challenging at times, I go to work every day with a big smile on my face.  The challenges drive me.  I would be bored without them.  I think, if you start going to work with a frown on your face, it’s time to take a hard look at yourself.

M$C: With your practice being multidisciplinary, can you give our readers your advice about setting up and maintaining such a practice in today’s healthcare system? 
Querio:
  The business of healthcare today is becoming more and more complex.  Certainly, with multidisciplinary practices, there are a great deal of legal requirements.  My advice for anyone who wants to move into this type of practice is to get sound legal, accounting and management advice.  Don’t try to do this on your own!  You should find an ethical and knowledgeable management group.  Research this, as I did, and you’ll be happy you did. 
Also, find an accountant and attorney who are well versed in health care issues.  Don’t just go out and hire your attorney friend who practices PI and divorce law to try to set up your multidisciplinary healthcare practice. 

M$C: Other than traditional chiropractic care, do you include any other type of services or products in your clinic which further help your patients as well as bring in additional revenue to your practice? 
Querio:  This is another area that our clinic is expanding.  We have used orthotics from Footlevelers and have had good success.  Due to the fact that we treat a variety of conditions in our medical and chiropractic departments, we use a multitude of orthopedic devices from Hessco.  These include everything from pillows and knee supports to casts.  We also utilize some nutritional products from Phytopharmica, which is based out of Green Bay.

M$C: Any final words for our readers? 
Querio:  I truly believe that this is a new era for our profession.  I’ve found that every health discipline has its own problems but, if we can put our differences aside and try to become a collective chiropractic voice, there are significant opportunities out there.  Patients are looking for what we have to offer.  If you can keep the positive picture in front of you, you will go far.  Don’t listen to the negative people around you.  Remember, no one ever built a statue for a critic.
You may contact Dr. Querio at 920-497-5711 or
[email protected].

Our sincere thanks to Dr. Querio and his Staff at Fox River Healthcare, S.C., of Green Bay, Winsconsin. TAC

Editor’s Note:  Do you have a million dollar practice that you’d like TAC to highlight in our Million Dollar Chiropractic column?  Contact TAC’s editor Jaclyn Busch Touzard by phone/fax: 1-305-716-9212 or email: [email protected].  We want your inspiring story!  Contact us today!

Interview with Fabrizio Mancini, D.C.

Fabrizio Mancini came to the United States in 1978 from Colombia, South America.  His dream was to become a doctor to help alleviate the suffering of others.  His journey began in Dallas as he studied pre-medicine at the prestigious University of Dallas where he was preparing to be a neurosurgeon.  He later discovered the chiropractic profession and enrolled at Parker College of Chiropractic  as a student in 1987, having recognized the potential in preventing disease and educating patients in a wellness lifestyle for optimum performance.  He opened the Mancini Chiropractic Center in 1993 in a Dallas suburb, where he has treated thousands of patients.

In 1999, at age 33, Dr. Fabrizio Mancini became one of the youngest college presidents in the nation when he was named fifth president of Parker College of Chiropractic.  He has been variously described as a family man; an internationally acclaimed professional speaker and educator; president of one of the leading chiropractic schools—and the largest chiropractic seminar series—in the world; healer; humanitarian and philanthropist.  Add to the list of credits his recent success in co-authoring Chicken Soup for the Chiropractic Soul, part of the bestselling series by Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen, and what emerges is the budding profile of a chiropractic icon.

In an interview with The American Chiropractor, Dr. Mancini discusses his new book, as well as his vision for the future of Parker Chiropractic College, Parker Seminars, and the chiropractic profession.

TAC: Give us some background information on yourself and your family.
Mancini:  I was born in Colombia, South America, and moved to the US in 1978 at the age of thirteen.  I decided to become a doctor in high school.  As a result, I moved to Dallas and enrolled in Pre Med courses at the University of Dallas.  I wanted to specialize in neurosurgery. 
While there, I discovered chiropractic and enrolled at Parker College of Chiropractic in 1987.  I graduated in 1990 and opened practices in Miami and abroad.  I later moved back to the Dallas area and established a practice in Irving, Texas.  During part of that time, I also served as Director of Admissions and Assistant to the President, Dr. Jim Parker, at Parker College.
I’ve written several articles for magazines and newspapers and have spoken on radio shows about chiropractic in both English and Spanish languages.  I have also been a guest on many TV shows and have co-authored the newly released Chicken Soup for the Chiropractic Soul®, with Mark Victor Hansen and Jack Canfield. 
Now, as far as awards go, I have received many humanitarian, educator, speaker, and volunteer honors.  They’ve been awarded from various civic and professional organizations, including the World Chiropractic Association, the Texas Chiropractic Association, and Heroes for Humanity. 
I’ve been married to my love, Alicia, for seven years and have two boys, Gianni (6) and Luciano (3).

TAC: What influenced you to seek chiropractic as a career?
Mancini:  A Parker student at a party mentioned the word chiropractic in 1986.  It was the first time I had heard the word.  She told me her story as to why she left medical school to become a chiropractor, and I was sold.

Raising money for the Save Out Subluxation (SOS) campaign, a legal suit instigated by the ACA, Dr. Mancini is joined onstage by many of the leaders in the profession, who presented contributions to the fund totaling over $600,000. Las Vegas Seminar 2003.TAC: How does the fact that you are a practicing chiropractor help you in developing seminars and running a chiropractic college?
Mancini:  It keeps me connected to the patients.  Dr. Parker shared with me that we must always keep the patients in mind as we make decisions in chiropractic.  Practicing does that for me.  Also, it lets me know what patients are thinking about the field, what’s going on in the insurance world, etc.

TAC:  As a chiropractor, the president of the largest chiropractic seminar series, and college president, what motivated you to collaborate with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen in the writing of Chicken Soup for the Chiropractic Soul?  How do you see it helping in the development of a chiropractic practice?
Mancini:  Since I have been in the role of President of Parker College, I have recognized that we, within chiropractic, know what we do and feel great about it.  But, when you look at the statistics and realize that we are not growing with the population, and that over 90% of the public has not experienced chiropractic, I am concerned.
Since I know Mark Victor Hansen, I asked him if he would help us share our miracles with the world through his best-selling book series.  His answer was, “Yes,” and we went to work.  Jack Canfield also agreed, and the publishers were thrilled. 
The genre of the series is a perfect match, as our stories are meant to touch the souls of the readers and inspire them to seek us out as their health care providers.  It is a great tool to help build a practice, as the book tells stories of the amazing healing power of the body through chiropractic.

TAC: As the president of Parker Seminars, how do you see the seminars’ relevance in helping today’s chiropractors and chiropractic assistants?
Mancini:  Our main goal is to fine-tune working procedures so that an office can manage a patient’s relationship from the time he makes that first call to the point where he sees the chiropractor on a regular basis.  We also have the best speakers on subjects like professional growth, personal growth, and the latest science supporting chiropractic.  Our team teachers are also founders of most techniques that keep our art on the cutting edge.  They are successful wellness experts who share their secrets for building and maintaining successful practices. 
A Parker Seminar is a total experience from personal to professional.  It elevates you to a higher level of performance, whether you are a student about to open a practice or a veteran of chiropractic.  We want to help chiropractors and assistants also create greater financial security so that more students will be attracted to chiropractic as a profession. 

TAC: What is the basis of Parker Seminars’ system for professional success?
Mancini: The system is based on the principles and procedures that Dr. Jim Parker taught for over fifty-one years.  Many believe this system is the foundation for some of the greatest successes we have seen in our profession.  We continue to u
evaluate and find ways to teach it more was the first time I had heard the word.  She told me her story as to why she left medical school to become a chiropractor, and I was sold.

TAC: How does the fact that you are a practicing chiropractor help you in developing seminars and running a chiropractic college?
Mancini:  It keeps me connected to the patients.  Dr. Parker shared with me that we must always keep the patients in mind as we make decisions in chiropractic.  Practicing does that for me.  Also, it lets me know what patients are thinking about the field, what’s going on in the insurance world, etc.

TAC:  As a chiropractor, the president of the largest chiropractic seminar series, and college president, what motivated you to collaborate with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen in the writing of Chicken Soup for the Chiropractic Soul?  How do you see it helping in the development of a chiropractic practice?
Mancini:  Since I have been in the role of President of Parker College, I have recognized that we, within chiropractic, know what we do and feel great about it.  But, when you look at the statistics and realize that we are not growing with the population, and that over 90% of the public has not experienced chiropractic, I am concerned.
Since I know Mark Victor Hansen, I asked him if he would help us share our miracles with the world through his best-selling book series.  His answer was, “Yes,” and we went to work.  Jack Canfield also agreed, and the publishers were thrilled. 
The genre of the series is a perfect match, as our stories are meant to touch the souls of the readers and inspire them to seek us out as their health care providers.  It is a great tool to help build a practice, as the book tells stories of the amazing healing power of the body through chiropractic.

TAC: As the president of Parker Seminars, how do you see the seminars’ relevance in helping today’s chiropractors and chiropractic assistants?
Mancini:  Our main goal is to fine-tune working procedures so that an office can manage a patient’s relationship from the time he makes that first call to the point where he sees the chiropractor on a regular basis.  We also have the best speakers on subjects like professional growth, personal growth, and the latest science supporting chiropractic.  Our team teachers are also founders of most techniques that keep our art on the cutting edge.  They are successful wellness experts who share their secrets for building and maintaining successful practices. 
A Parker Seminar is a total experience from personal to professional.  It elevates you to a higher level of performance, whether you are a student about to open a practice or a veteran of chiropractic.  We want to help chiropractors and assistants also create greater financial security so that more students will be attracted to chiropractic as a profession. 

TAC: What is the basis of Parker Seminars’ system for professional success?
Mancini: The system is based on the principles and procedures that Dr. Jim Parker taught for over fifty-one years.  Many believe this system is the foundation for some of the greatest successes we have seen in our profession.  We continue to u
evaluate and find ways to teach it more effectively.

TAC:  You’ve been quoted as saying that you and Parker Seminars want to “move the profession forward.”  How do you see the seminars as the vehicle to accomplish this vision?
Mancini:  I believe that the profession, as a whole, is a reflection of where we are individually.  We, at the seminars, want to help individuals grow by teaching them ways to practice effectively.  This, in turn, helps the profession grow.  We want to double the patients that come to chiropractic within the next ten years.  We want to lead the wellness movement and demonstrate that, together, we can all help more people.  We want to bring patients to our seminars and have the best of the best give lay lectures so that those patients can become even more motivated to refer everyone they know.  We want to continue to raise funds for worthy causes.  We want to get our profession more fit (Parker Get Fit) and involve our children by having a program for them at every seminar (Parker Kids Club).  We want to continue to be the place where everyone  goes because they know everyone  benefits.

TAC: Parker has introduced some pretty innovative post-graduate programs. What are they, and how do they relate to “moving the profession forward”?
Mancini:  We have implemented many programs including neurology, acupuncture, and pediatrics.  This fall we will be starting the Parker Business Academy.  This program is designed and operated by some of the greatest business minds out there.  We joined forces with Dr. Nathan Jones and his team of experts to create a program that teaches basic business skills in managing an office.  We have realized that most chiropractors love being doctors, but they may not be the best CEO’s in their offices.  We now will have a program that will teach them.  This, in turn, will increase the financial u  welfare of the profession, allowing us to was the first time I had heard the word.  She told me her story as to why she left medical school to become a chiropractor, and I was sold.

TAC: How does the fact that you are a practicing chiropractor help you in developing seminars and running a chiropractic college?
Mancini:  It keeps me connected to the patients.  Dr. Parker shared with me that we must always keep the patients in mind as we make decisions in chiropractic.  Practicing does that for me.  Also, it lets me know what patients are thinking about the field, what’s going on in the insurance world, etc.

TAC:  As a chiropractor, the president of the largest chiropractic seminar series, and college president, what motivated you to collaborate with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen in the writing of Chicken Soup for the Chiropractic Soul?  How do you see it helping in the development of a chiropractic practice?
Mancini:  Since I have been in the role of President of Parker College, I have recognized that we, within chiropractic, know what we do and feel great about it.  But, when you look at the statistics and realize that we are not growing with the population, and that over 90% of the public has not experienced chiropractic, I am concerned.
Since I know Mark Victor Hansen, I asked him if he would help us share our miracles with the world through his best-selling book series.  His answer was, “Yes,” and we went to work.  Jack Canfield also agreed, and the publishers were thrilled. 
The genre of the series is a perfect match, as our stories are meant to touch the souls of the readers and inspire them to seek us out as their health care providers.  It is a great tool to help build a practice, as the book tells stories of the amazing healing power of the body through chiropractic.

TAC: As the president of Parker Seminars, how do you see the seminars’ relevance in helping today’s chiropractors and chiropractic assistants?
Mancini:  Our main goal is to fine-tune working procedures so that an office can manage a patient’s relationship from the time he makes that first call to the point where he sees the chiropractor on a regular basis.  We also have the best speakers on subjects like professional growth, personal growth, and the latest science supporting chiropractic.  Our team teachers are also founders of most techniques that keep our art on the cutting edge.  They are successful wellness experts who share their secrets for building and maintaining successful practices. 
A Parker Seminar is a total experience from personal to professional.  It elevates you to a higher level of performance, whether you are a student about to open a practice or a veteran of chiropractic.  We want to help chiropractors and assistants also create greater financial security so that more students will be attracted to chiropractic as a profession. 

TAC: What is the basis of Parker Seminars’ system for professional success?
Mancini: The system is based on the principles and procedures that Dr. Jim Parker taught for over fifty-one years.  Many believe this system is the foundation for some of the greatest successes we have seen in our profession.  We continue to u
evaluate and find ways to teach it more effectively.

TAC:  You’ve been quoted as saying that you and Parker Seminars want to “move the profession forward.”  How do you see the seminars as the vehicle to accomplish this vision?
Mancini:  I believe that the profession, as a whole, is a reflection of where we are individually.  We, at the seminars, want to help individuals grow by teaching them ways to practice effectively.  This, in turn, helps the profession grow.  We want to double the patients that come to chiropractic within the next ten years.  We want to lead the wellness movement and demonstrate that, together, we can all help more people.  We want to bring patients to our seminars and have the best of the best give lay lectures so that those patients can become even more motivated to refer everyone they know.  We want to continue to raise funds for worthy causes.  We want to get our profession more fit (Parker Get Fit) and involve our children by having a program for them at every seminar (Parker Kids Club).  We want to continue to be the place where everyone  goes because they know everyone  benefits.

TAC: Parker has introduced some pretty innovative post-graduate programs. What are they, and how do they relate to “moving the profession forward”?
Mancini:  We have implemented many programs including neurology, acupuncture, and pediatrics.  This fall we will be starting the Parker Business Academy.  This program is designed and operated by some of the greatest business minds out there.  We joined forces with Dr. Nathan Jones and his team of experts to create a program that teaches basic business skills in managing an office.  We have realized that most chiropractors love being doctors, but they may not be the best CEO’s in their offices.  We now will have a program that will teach them.  This, in turn, will increase the financial u  welfare of the profession, allowing us to further  advance chiropractic.

Dr. Mancini presents Dr. Wayne Dyer with a special achievement award at the Las Vegas Parker Seminar 2003.TAC: What are your thoughts on the role of Parker Seminars in leading the way to the creation of a new paradigm in overall wellness?
Mancini:  I believe that Parker Seminars bring all parties together in recognizing that even though our opinions may differ, we still have common goals—and that we should work together in achieving our objectives.  We believe that we should be the ones to help define what wellness means and to lead the wellness movement (including patients).

TAC:  James W. Parker, the founder of Parker Seminars, developed the original Parker Principles. How do those principles relate to today’s chiropractic professionals and other wellness practitioners?
Mancini:  I believe the principles never change.  In order to give justice to Dr. Parker, each team teacher shares one principle and how it changed his/her life at each seminar.  This helps the audience consistently hear the message that the principles work and have many effects on people.

TAC: Parker Seminars Las Vegas has become THE event for the chiropractic profession.  What is your vision for Las Vegas in 2004?
Mancini:  Our vision for Vegas 2004 is to have more than 10,000 professionals registered.  We hope that all that came last January will come again and bring someone with them.  We have received a lot of feedback on what they loved in past seminars and what they would like to experience, so we are prepared to give them what they want. 
We also plan to have the largest gathering of patients ever—so they can be our champions in spreading the word in their respective communities.  We will be bringing in many celebrities from outside our profession and will continue to bring the best from within our profession.  We want all the associations and groups within chiropractic to learn, communicate, be inspired, and be entertained.  We plan to have the media involved so that it can spread a greater awareness as to who we are and what we do.

TAC: Any final words for our readers?
Mancini:  Dr. Jim Parker taught me one of the most profound lessons in my life.  He said, “Develop a compassion to serve that is greater than the compulsion to survive.”  My message to the profession is that we should not just survive—but be sensitive to the needs of humanity and become its greatest resource for health and wellness.  We need to grow from within and keep a vision that is greater than all of us individually.  This profession was not meant to be for a selective few; it was meant to be for ALL.

You may contact Dr. Fabrizio Mancini by telephone at 1-800-438-6932, or by e-mail at [email protected]. TAC

Candida/Yeast & Homeopathy

In recent years, Candida (“yeast”) has become a household word among many health conscious people, producing over one hundred common and elusive symptoms prominent in our society.  The broad range of symptoms can include fatigue, allergies, immune weaknesses, difficulty thinking, learning disabilities, hyperactivity, constipation, digestive disorders, respiratory disorders, cravings, mold sensitivity, skin disorders, headaches and mental and emotional disorders such as sensitive emotions and mood changes.  Results, however, using both drug and nutritional therapies, have been varied, with a high percentage pattern of recurring symptoms after treatment.

Many patients with Candida problems wander around with chronic, elusive health problems, most of which are either undiagnosed or resistant to treatment. The savvy chiropractor, equipped with a few homeopathic formulas, a probiotic, and a basic Candida diet (low yeast, low sugar and low carbohydrate), can significantly influence this epidemic that has been affecting and confounding our society.

Through our twenty-five years of treating yeast disorders, we have discovered homeopathy to be of tremendous value in their successful correction.  Although homeopathy is not a cure-all, it is commonly the key to the actual cure!

Homeopathy works deep within the nervous system to activate our body’s natural, innate ability to heal.  Other treatments, whether conventional or nutritional, often fall short of true correction because they do not correct the malfunctions within the energetic control systems of our body.  Without this deeper homeopathic correction, Candida or any other condition may commonly recur—or simply not respond.  Homeopathy equips the chiropractor with the ability to correct nerve interferences deep in places where the hands cannot.

The following generic homeopathic formula names could be possible solutions for fully correcting all the possible causes to chronic candidacies.  They are listed to help you think like a homeopath and find the potential solutions homeopathically.

  • A constitutional enhancement formula—For the overall activation of our natural healthy functions.
  • Female discomforts—Specific for vaginal yeast infections.
  • Fatigue reliever—For general fatigue, burnout, and low blood sugar.
  • Allergy/food & chemical relief—For associated sensitivities.
  • Athletes foot formula—For associated skin fungus.
  • Skin irritations & itch—For associated symptoms.
  • Hair & nail formula—For nail fungus.
  • Allergies & hay fever—For associated symptoms.
  • Constipation—For associated symptoms.
  • Mental alertness—For associated symptoms
  • Stress control formula—For stress that causes elevated cortisol that can weaken the immune system, making it vulnerable to excess yeast growth.
  • Anxiety & nervousness—For associated symptoms.
  • Gonorrhea (Sycotic) Miasm formula—For inherited weaknesses which create susceptibility. TAC

For over fifty years, energy fields of the body have been measured through various instruments such as Kirlian photography.  Scientists have observed that imbalances and blocks within the energetic control patterns of the body occur long before organic disease may manifest.

Homeopathy provides us over two hundred years of time tested science for correcting the deeper causes of disease.  In fact, even inherited weakness passed down genetically for over a thousand years can be corrected with homeopathy.  There are Miasm formulas in homeopathy to help correct the genetic weaknesses that make us susceptible to certain diseases.

Homeopathic formulas have been developed over the past twenty years to correct the common causes underlying our susceptibility to yeast or fungal overgrowths in both females and males.  These overgrowths can cause Candida Albicans infections anywhere there are mucus membranes present, such as the reproductive system, intestinal tract, mouth, and respiratory tract.  Candida can go systemic or into blood and cells of our body, causing a broad spectrum of elusive symptoms. 

Homeopathy is a highly individualized healing art.  This distinctiveness is fundamental to its ability to correct the primary causes or malfunctions within us that allow manifestation of diseases.  The key to homeopathy’s great successes is finding all the formulas that correct the underlying malfunctions within us.  Homeopathy is based on the Law of Similars; that is, whatever formulas sound similar should be considered as possible solutions to each individual’s symptom patterns.

Reflex response tests like Applied Kinesiology, leg length tests or acupuncture point testing devices are essential to discovering and discerning the formulas an individual could need—as well as not need.  These procedures are paramount to correcting the chronic recurring health problems plaguing our society.

Frank J. King, Jr., is a nationally recognized researcher, author and lecturer on homeopathy.  In addition, Dr. King is the founder and director of King Bio Pharmaceuticals, a registered homeopathic manufacturing company dedicated to completing chiropractic destiny with the marriage of homeopathy.  Dr. King offers, complimentary to all Doctors of Chiropractic, his turnkey procedural system for the high volume practice called, The Chiropractic Enhancer systemTM (CES).  It is so easy to use that you can successfully apply homeopathy in your practice using any company’s products in one day. Call King Bio Pharma-ceuticals, Asheville, N.C. 1-800-543-3245 or e-mail: [email protected].

The American Chiropractor’s Seminar planning handbook

The following list has been designed to be your Seminar Planning Handbook, so be sure to hold onto this information as a tool for selecting and planning your seminar experiences.

Associations

American Chiropractic Association
2003 ACA House of Delegates Meeting, September 16-20, 2003, Albuquerque, NM.  Call 800-986-4636 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.amerchiro.org.

Federation of Straight Chiropractors and Organizations (FSCO)
The FSCO provides The Foundation Seminars throughout the year at different locations coast to coast.  Continuing education programs in cooperation with Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic.  Call 800-521-9856 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.straightchiropractic.com.

Florida Chiropractic Association
FCA National Convention & Expo 2003, August 15-17, 2003, Orlando, FL.  Attendance 2,000+ and a 400 exhibit expo.  License renewal credits for DC’s, CA’s, CCPA’s, LMT’s and X-ray Techs.  Call 407-290-5883 for additional information,      email
[email protected] or see www.fcachiro.org.

International Chiropractors Association
International Conference on Chiropractic and Pediatrics. November 7-9, 2003, Lake Tahoe, CA. Call 800-423-4690 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.chiropractic.org.

New York State Chiropractic Association
2003 Fall Convention. With Joseph Keating. September 19-21, 2003, Rye Brook, NY.  Call 518-785-6346 for additional information or see
www.nysca.com.

Texas Chiropractic Association/TCCO
Designated Doctor Impairment Rating Training,, October 10-11, 2003, Austin, TX. 16 CEU.  Call 512-477-9292 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.chirotexas.com.

Wisconsin Chiropractic Association
2003 Fall Convention, October 2-5, 2003, Wisconsin Dells, WI.  Call 608-256-7023 for additional information or see
www.wisconsinchiropractic.com.

World Chiropractic Alliance
International Summit. April 29-May 1, 2004, Pennsylvania. Three days of exciting presentations and activities for subluxation-based doctors. CE Credit available. Call 1-800-347-1011 for additional information or see
www.worldchiropracticalliance.org.

ACA Rehab Council
Annual Educational Program, with Dr. Dave Juehring, Dr. Jeffrey Tucker and Dr. Terry Shaw, March 6-7, 2004. Dallas, TX.  CEU for all states applied through University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic.  Call Dr. Donald Fedoryk at 908-722-9075 or email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.ccptr.org.

Access Workshop
With Dr. Robert Wiegand.  The Access Workshop teaches practitioners how to rapidly develop exceptional levels of perception.  The Access Workshop has been providing enhanced awareness training for somatic practitioners since 1983.  The workshop presents a cutting edge, neuro-physiological approach for rapidly developing exceptional perception skills. Call 215-674-9108 or email
[email protected] for  dates and locations or see www.accessworkshop.com.

Acu-POWER Emotional Technique
Dr. James V. Durlacher, DC, DIBAK.  Acu-POWER is an alternative technique, which eliminates fears, phobias, anxieties, addictions, etc.  A minimum of 50% of all people seeing doctors have a significant emotional component to their physical problem.  You will have a 95-97% effectiveness rate with your patients.  Call 480-827-2044 or email
[email protected] for dates and locations, or see www.freedomfromfearforever.com.

Activator Methods International, Ltd.
Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique classes are approved for 12 CE hours for each seminar.  Call 1-800-598-0224 for dates and locations or see
www.activator.com.

Active Release Techniques (ART)
With instructor Michael P. Leahy, DC.  Each month ART trains 100 doctors to be the best in the world at the diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue disorders.  Don’t be left behind!  Call 888-396-2727 for dates and locations or see
www.activerelease.com.

Advanced Muscle Palpation
Dr. Nicholas Spano is a regular speaker for the International Chiropractic Pediatrics Association.  The seminars are approved for CE credits through Life University.  Call 570- 265-2225 for dates and locations or see
http://home.flash.net/~unsublx8/.

Applied Kinesiology
For more information contact The International College of Applied Kinesiology-USA by calling 913-384-5336.

Bio-Geometric Integration Seminars
Dr. Sue Brown and BGI seminars will empower you with this integrative approach to the philosophy, science, & art of chiropractic, building bridges between osseous, tonal and postural approaches.  BGI I and BGI Osseous are approved for CE Credit in most states.  Call 630-690-6080 or email
[email protected]  for dates and locations or see www.bgiseminars.com.

Chiropractic Leadership Alliance
“Journey into Healing,” with Deepak Chopra, MD; David Simon, MD; Patrick Gentempo, JR., DC.  On October 9-12, 2003, in The Chopra Center in Carlsbad, CA.  Together, we will explore such topics as: Mind Body Immunity, Nature´s Codes of Intelligence, Healing the Heart and Imbalance to Disease.  Applied for 22 hours of CE credit in all states.  Approval Pending.  Call 800-285-2001 or see
www.subluxation.com.

Directional Non-Force Techniquetm
Taught by Christopher F. John, DC.  August 15-17, Toronto, Full Spine; September 20-21, Los Angeles, Low Back/Thoracic; October 17-19, Philadelphia, Full Spine.  Call 310-657-2338 for additional dates and locations or see
www.nonforce.com.

DMX-Works, Inc.

DMX Innovator, Fall 2003, in Cayman Islands.  Call 800-839-6757, email [email protected] for dates and locations or see www.dmxworks.com.

Dr. Alan Creed Seminars
Boost Your Practice—Bridging Techniques, Styles and Technologies, October 25- 26, in Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Nov. 15-16, in Dallas, TX.  Eligible for 12 hours CE Credits from Texas Chiropractic College. Call 305-365-3818, email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.dralancreed.com.

Dr. Mally’s Extremity Adjusting Techniques
International Conference on Carpal Tunnel.  September 13-14 in Dallas, TX; September 20-21 in Orlando, FL.  Each 12-hour course includes hands-on technique instruction in addition to examination, diagnosis, biomechanics, X-ray and
research abstracts of the related injuries and syndromes.  Call 800-779-HAND (4263) for additional dates and locations or email
[email protected].

Foot Levelers, Inc. 
2003 Fall Mega Conferences has a panel of nationally distinguished presenters.  This series consists of 33 seminars throughout 24 states, from Boston to San Francisco, presenting practical information you can put to immediate use on topics such as injuries, rehab, clinical application, and adjusting techniques.  20 hours of CEU´s are available for each three-day event.  September 26-28, in Los Angeles, CA; Oct. 17-19, in Newark, NJ; Nov. 14-16, in Chicago, IL.  Call 800-553-4860 for additional dates and locations or see
www.footlevelers.com.

The Gonstead Seminar
Call 800-842-6852 for information or see
www.gonsteadseminar.com.

Graston Technique
Graston Technique Basic & Module II, September 6-7, in Newark, NJ; September 13-14, in Lombard, IL; September 20-21, in Las Vegas, NV.  Approved for CE credit.  Call 866-926-2828 for additional dates and locations or see
www.grastontechnique.com.

Harrison Chiropractic Biophysics (CBP) Seminars
CBP Annual Convention with Dr. Dan Murphy, Dr. Don Harrison, Dr. Deed Harrison and Dr. Chris Colloca, September 26-28, 2003, in Jackson Hole, WY.  Scientific methods in subluxation evaluation and correction.  14 hours of CE, spon-u sored by National University.  Call 1-800-346-5146 or see
www.idealspine.com.

Holder Research Institute
Torque Release Technique with Dr. Jay M. Holder is CE approved.  Call 800-490-7714/305-535-8803, email
[email protected]  for dates and locations or see www.torquerelease.com.

IMPAC Synergistic Seminars
Application of the ArthroStim adjusting instrument and VibraCussor soft tissue instrument with Dr. Alan Creed and Dr. Jeff Rockwell. January 15-18, 2004, in Las Vegas.  Call 800-569-8624 for seminar dates, topics and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.ImpacInc.net.

ITM-Vivatek
Call 1-877-VIVATEK (848-2835) for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.vivatek.com.

Jtech by Zevex
Become a Certified Functional Capacity Evaluator, October 18-19, in Dallas, TX, and December 6-7, in Miami, FL.  Expand your practice with this functional capacity evaluations training & certification seminar.  CE approved through SCUHS for 14 credits. Call 800-985-8324, Ext. 296; email
[email protected] or see www.zevex.com/physicalevaluation/education.

Leader International/Leander Health Technologies
Bridging the Interdisciplinary Gulf and Making MD’s Your Advocate, with John J. Triano, DC, PhD. in Orlando, FL, FCA National Convention, August 15-17.  Dr. Triano will teach attendees how technique practice allows the average practitioners to position themselves as the “experts” to other providers.  CE approved 4 hrs in most states.  Call 800-635-8188 for additional dates and locations or see
www.chiropractictables.com.

Mastering Chiropractic with Certainty
MC2, A Tonal Model for Upper Cervical Toggle Recoil, with Dr. Steve Hoffman, on October 25-26, in Tampa/Clearwater, FL.  Experience a practice without contradiction by combining the most important elements of Philosophy, Science and Art of Chiropractic.  Call 760.943.7040, email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see: www.masteringchiropractic.com.

The Morter B.E.S.T. Technique
Basic. September 6, 2003, Harrisburg, PA. Call 800-874-1478 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see  www.morter.com.

NMT:  The Feinberg Technique
Neuro Modulation Technique Seminars, with Leslie S. Feinberg, DC, September 19-21, 2003, in San Diego, CA.  See your licensing board to see if NMT Seminars meet CE criteria.  Call 541-720-1383, email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.nmtseminars.com.

Network Spinal Analysis (NSA)
Dr. Donald Epstein teaches NSA.  Call 303-678-8086 or email
[email protected] for more information or see www.innateintelligence.com.

Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) Seminars
Seminar locations throughout the US.  CEU’s are cosponsored by University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College for several states.  Call 800-888-4638 to have a schedule mailed to you or visit www.netmindbody.com.

Neuromuscular Reeducationsm Seminars
The soft tissue injury solution taught by Peter J. Levy, DC, September 13-14, in New York, NY.  Approved for CEU credits in all states but Oklahoma.  Call 805-687-2111, email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.neuromuscularreeducation.com.

Noromed, Inc.
Outcome Assessment of the VSC, with Dr. Mark van Hemert, and Surface EMG and Dynamic ROM Applications in Clinical Practice, with Dr. Jeffery Cram presenting on various dates & locations.  Approved for 12 CEU´s by the National University of Health Sciences.  Call 800-426-0316, email
[email protected] for dates and locations or see www.noromed.com.

Pro-Solutions for Chiropractic
Advanced Chiropractic Symposium, with Dr. Maurice A. Pisciottano and a panel of nationally distinguished presenters, November 8-9, 2003, in Atlanta, GA.  Approved for CE credits through Logan College.  Call 877-942-4284, email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.pro-adjuster.us.

Quantum Energy, LLC
Dr. Paul Yanick. December 15, 2003, Vail, CO.  Call/fax 845-340-8606 for additional dates and locations or see
www.quantumenergy.com.

The Roth Institute (Division of Wellness Systems, Inc.)
Matrix Repatterning seminars, Toronto, September 19-21, 2003; Cozumel, February 18-20, 2004.  Approved for CE credit through Logan College of Chiropractic.  Call 877-905-ROTH (7684), email
[email protected] for additional dates and locations or see www.MatrixRepatterning.com.

Sacro Occipital Technique Organization (SOTO)–USA
SOTO-USA Clinical Symposium, with John Upledger, DO, October 9-12, in Washington, DC.  CE Credit available through New York Chiropractic College.  Call 336-760-1618, email
[email protected]    for additional dates and locations or see www.SOTO-USA.org.

Segmental Drop Adjusting
Featuring The Thompson Technique, with Dr. Wayne Henry Zemelka, sponsored by Footlevelers,  August 23-24, Baltimore, MD; September 27-28, Pittsburgh, PA; October 18-19, Albuquerque, NM; November 22-23, Charleston, SC; Dec 6-7, Dallas TX.  Call 1-800-553-4860 to register, email
[email protected] for additional dates and information or see www.drzemelka.com.

Toftness Post-Graduate School of Chiropractic
Toftness System of Chiropractic.  Call 715-268-7500, email
[email protected] for dates and locations or see www.toftness.org.

The Trigenics Institute of Myoneurological Medicine
Module 1–Upper & Lower Extremities & Basic Clinical Applications, September 5-7, New York, NY; Module 2—Head & Spine Intermediate Clinical Applications Sport Applications, September 26-28, 2003.  Application for CE approval is underway.  Call 888-514-9355, email
[email protected]  for additional dates and locations or see www.trigenicsinstitute.com.

Total Body Modification Technique
Dr. Victor L. Frank, founder, and a panel of nationally distinguished presenters.  CE approved for re-licensing credit for most states through the University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic.  Call 801-571-2411 for dates and locations or see
www.tbmseminars.com.

The Vickery Method (TVM)
Brice E. Vickery leads this ongoing website educational opportunity. Call 803-644-0607 or email
[email protected] for additional information or see www.doctorvickery.com.

Myo-Logic Diagnostics
Bulletproof Seminars, with Dr. Gregg Friedman, DC, CCSP, FIACA.  Learn how to quickly and easily examine & document using HCFA & AMA guidelines.  Show them the evidence, “bulletproof” your claims & get paid!  6 hours CE credit approved by Lincoln College of Postprofessional, Graduate & Continuing Education.  Call 800-768-7253, Ext. 2, for additional information or see
www.bulletproofseminars.com.

ACA Council on Nutrition
With Dr. Low Dog, Dr. Chi, Dr. David Brady, Dr. Jeanne D’Brant, Dr. Overton, Dr. Robert Marshall and Dr. Duterme.  24 hours of CE credit through Northwestern Chiropractic College.  April 22-25, 2004, in Dallas, TX.  Call 540-635-8844 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.councilonnutrition.com.

Anabolic Laboratories
Chiropractic Nutritional Program. September 6-7, at National University of Health Sciences, Nashville, TN; September 13-14, Pennsylvania Chiropractic Association, PA.  Call 1-800-445-6849/4032 for additional dates and locations or see
www.anaboliclabs.com.

Bio Active Nutritional, Inc.
Call 800-288-9525 for dates and locations or see
www.bioactive-us.com.
Biotics Research Corporation Contact Reflex Analysis-Extravaganza, with Dr. Dick Versendall.  October 31-November 2, 2003, Houston, TX.  20 hours CME through TCC.  Call 800-231-5777 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.bioticsresearch.com.

Daniel Chapter One
The Founder of BioMolecular Nutrition.  Call 1-800-504-5511 for dates and locations or see
www.danielchapterone.com.

King Bio Educational Services
King Bio Educational Services provide seminars in the contemporary applications of homeopathy for the chiropractor.
Certification is available through the Natural Medicine Institute.  CE credits approved by Logan, Texas and Connecticut.  Call 800-543-3245 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see  www.kingbiochiro.com.

Loomis Institute of Enzyme Nutrition
Howard F. Loomis, DC, FIACA. Approved by the State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board.  Seminar attendees are eligible to receive 12 CEU’s from National University of Health Sciences.  Call 800-662-2630 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see http://www.loomisinstitute.com.

 

Nutri-Spec
Call 800-736-4320 for dates and locations or see
www.nutri-spec.net.

Standard Process
Mastering Natural Healing at Sea, with Michael Robbins, DC.  22 CEU’s sponsored by Texas Chiropractic College (applied for in all states–D.C. only).  May 9-18, 2004.  To book your cruise and register for the seminar, contact Tedd Washington at Cruises Only, 800-463-9708 or see
www.standardprocess.com.

Future Perfect, Inc.
Chiropractic Pediatric Conference, u with  Drs. Teri & Stu Warner, plus 10 speakers.  October 10-12 in Los Angeles, CA.
Call 877-295-5437 for additional information or see
www.ChiroPediatrics.com.

International Chiropractors Association
International Conference on Chiropractic and Pediatrics. November 7-9, 2003, Lake Tahoe, CA. Call 800-423-4690 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.chiropractic.org.

International Chiropractic Pediatric Association
ICPA Extravaganza, April 30-May 2, 2004.  All seminars approved for CE’s by Cleveland Colleges, Northwestern Health Sciences University, Parker College, Life University.  Call 800-670-5437 for additional dates and locations or see
www.icpa4kids.com.

The Baby Adjusters
With Drs. Jennifer & Palmer Peet.  CE approved through Life East & Life West.  Call 1-800-824-3031 for additional information or email
[email protected].

Bodyblade/Hymanson, Inc.
National Athletic Trainer’s Association Annual Conference, June 15-19, 2004.  Call 800-772-5233 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.bodyblade.com.

Fernandez Consulting
Learn how to get all the new P.I. patients you want, how to streamline P.I. office procedures, and how to win in court, with Dr. Peter Fernandez.  October 24-26, 2003, in Atlanta, GA.  Call 800-882-4476 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.DrFernandez.com.

National Board of Forensic Chiropractic
Individual Instruction in Forensic, Disability & Impairment Rating, in Manning, SC, with Dr. Preston Fitzgerald Sr. 120 CE hours.  Call 803-435-5078 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.forensicexaminers.org.

Cleveland Chiropractic College
Cleveland Conferences with Mark Victor Hansen.  Submitted for 20 hours CE by Cleveland Chiropractic College.  October 9-11, Los Angeles Expo 2003.  Kansas City Campus:  Call 816-501-0125 for additional dates and locations; Los Angeles Campus:  Call 323-906-2108, email
[email protected] or see www.cleveland.edu.

Life Chiropractic College West
Homecoming, October 16-18, 2003.  Big plans are in the making for Life West’s 20th anniversary.  You can reach the Continuing Education and Postgraduate Department by calling 510-780-4508 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.lifewest.org.

Life University
Homecoming, October 9-12, 2003.  Call  770-426-2753 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.life.edu.

Logan College of Chiropractic
Homecoming. Jun 10-13, 2004. Contact the Alumni Office for Details 800-782-3344, email
[email protected] or see www.logan.edu.

New York Chiropractic College
NYCC Alumni Day Fall 2003, November 1, 2003, Depew, NY.  Call 1-800-434-3955 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.nycc.edu/continuing_education.asp.

Northwestern Health Sciences University
Homecoming and Winter Gathering, February 5-7, 2004.  CE credits applied for in all states.  Call 952-885-5446 for additional dates and locations or see
www.nwhealth.edu.

Palmer Colleges and The Palmer Institute for Professional Advancement
The Fountainhead Experience, October 10-12, 2003, Santa Clara, CA;  February 20-22, 2004, Port Orange, FL;

Palmer Chiropractic Lyceum, August 12-14, 2004, Davenport, IA.  26 hours of continuing education credits.  Call 866-592-3861 for additional information or see www.palmerlyceum.com  The Palmer Institute offers around 100 seminars per year for continuing education.  Call 1-800-452-5032 for dates and locations, email [email protected] or see www.palmerinstitute.net.

Parker College of Chiropractic
Homecoming & License Renewal, September 18-21, 2003, Dallas,TX (Parker College Campus).  Call 1-800-266-4723 for additional dates and locations or see
www.postgrad.parkercc.edu.

Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic
Lyceum, May 27-30, 2004.  Approved for CE credit by various state boards.  Call 800-849-8771 or 864-578-8771, Ext. 1229, for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.sherman.edu.      

Southern California University of Health Sciences—Postgraduate Division
Radiographic QC, with John Bassano, DC, DACBR.  September 20, 2003, SCU Campus.  Seminars and courses in Rehabilitation, Sports, QME, MUA, Masters Degree in Musculoskeletal Management, license renewal for chiropractic and acupuncture.  Call 562-902-3379 for ad- ditional information, email
[email protected] or see www.scuhs.edu.

Texas Chiropractic College
Low Tech/No Tech Rehab, October 4-5, 2003, Pasadena, TX.  Call 800-533-9822 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.txchiro.edu.

Western States Chiropractic College
Chiropractic Orthopedics #4, August 16-17, 2003, Portland, OR.  Call 800 215-3716 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.wschiro.edu.

American Board of Independent Medical Examiners
ABIME Certification Review and AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment, 4th and 5th Edition Training Course, October 18-19, 2003, Chicago, IL.  ABIME Certification Exam, October 19, 2003, Chicago, IL.  Call 800-234-3490 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.abime.org.

Back to Basic Golf Academy
With Dr. Raymond Trottier and Dr. John Danchik.  CE approved by NYCC.  Call 603-279-6348 for additional dates and locations or see
www.backtobasicsgolfacademy.com.

Breakthrough Coaching
Live Your Vision!  Develop your Vision and Strengthen your Purpose.  October 25, 2003, Newark, NJ. All seminars approved for CE through UBCC.  Call 800-723-8423 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.mybreakthrough.com.

Bruce Parker Consulting
Practice Freedom System #1, with Dr. Bruce Parker, August 15-16, 2003. Chicago, IL.  How to Immediately Increase New Patients/How To Convert Pain Patients to Wellness.  Call 866-612-6224 for ad- ditional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.BruceParkerConsulting.com.

Chiro Advance Services
With Heidi Farrell, Dr. Reggie Gold, Dr. Ken Savage and Dr. Lou Corleto.  October 10-11, Minneapolis, MN.  Dedicated to teaching and inspiring chiropractors and their teams to lead a subluxation-based practice.  This means not dictating by what insurance “will” cover, but rather by what the people need for ultimate health.  Learn what it takes to simplify your communication, market your practice and attract more “families” for lifelong chiropractic care.  Call 715-635-5211 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.chiroadvanceservices.com.

Chiropractic Cornerstones
Judy Campanale, DC, Dick Plummer, DC, September 13, Miami, FL; September 19-21, Chicago, IL.  Developing and building tomorrow’s practices today.  CE credit approved by Sherman College and also with individual state board approval.  Call 800-537-2607 for additional dates and locations or email
[email protected]; [email protected].

Chiropractic Equity Offices Seminars
CEO-Neurologic Based Chiropractic, with Dr. Richard Barwell, DC.  CEO is the first and only chiropractic support company with procedures designed to bring the power of the adjustment and its direct effect on the CNS into daily practice.  Learn how EEG studies have changed today’s practice.  Tired of the pain based practice?  Find out how to move patients out of pain consciousness.  Don’t miss these NEW concepts.  November 21-23, 2003, Orlando, FL.  Call 321-868-5690 for additional information or email
[email protected].

Dallas Humble, Inc.
Power Practice University, October 2-4, 2003, Las Vegas, NV.  It’s approved for 12
general CE hours through Logan College.  Call 800-282-1947, Ext. 100, for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.dallashumble.com.

David Singer Enterprises
Seminars are held every weekend at various cities throughout the country.  Call Sally at 1-800-326-1797 for dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.davidsingerenterprises.com.

EON Systems, Inc., Home of The Practice Solution 2000
TPS 2000 Training Seminars, for clients to learn all the aspects of TPS 2000.  Call 800-955-6448 for information, email [email protected] or see www.eonsystems.net.

The Family Practice, Inc.
Call 866-532-3327 for dates and locations or see
www.thefamilypractice.net.

Fernandez Consulting
Learn how to get all the new P.I. patients you want, how to streamline P.I. office procedures, and how to win in court, with Dr. Peter Fernandez.  October 24-26, 2003, in Atlanta, GA.  Call 800-882-4476 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.DrFernandez.com.

Karl Parker Seminars
Annual Show, September 25-28, Las Vegas.  CE approved by Texas Chiropractic College.  Call 888-4DR-KARL (437-5275) for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.karlparkerseminars.com.

Kats Management
Dr. David Kats and Keith Maule.  Kats u  Management seminars cover a wide variety of topics aimed toward growing the chiropractic office.  Topics include procedures, insurance, CA training, marketing, new patients, current health care issues, and more.  September 6-7, Columbus, OH; September. 13-14, Chicago, IL.  Call 800-843-9162 for additional information and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.katsmanagement.com.

The Masters Circle, Inc.
Super Conference 2003:  Chiropractic in Action, with Dr. Guy Reikeman, Dr. Patrick Gentempo, Dr. Wayne Dyer, Dr. Carol Ann Malizia, Bill Esteb, and a special presentation by Jack Canfield.  CE credits given through Life Chiropractic College West.  November 6-8, 2003, Las Vegas, NV.  Call 1-800-451-4514 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.themasterscircle.com.

Patient Media, Inc.
The Patient’s Point of View, with William Esteb.  September 18, Seattle, WA.  Call 800-486-2337 for additional information, email
[email protected] or see www.patientmedia.com.

Personal Chiropractic Consultants
Volume Practice Seminar, with Dr. Tom Morgan, September 20, 2003, Atlanta, GA.  Call 770-748-6084 for additional dates and locations.

Practice Perfect, Inc.
Practice Perfect Extravaganza Seminar, with Daniel Dahan, DC, President; Rafath Quraishi, MD; Robert Lupo, DC; John Turner, DC; and a complete staff training modules by Judy Monroe.  November 13-15, 2003, Las Vegas, NV.  Contact 888-67-DAHAN, email
[email protected] or see www.dahan.com.

Ultimate Practice Systems
Guidelines to an Ultimate Practice, with Dr. Timothy Gay.  Session III, September 6, Costa Mesa, CA; September 13, San Diego, CA; November 18, Sacramento, CA.  Call 866-797-8366 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or visit www.ultimatepracticesystems.com.

The Upledger Institute, Inc.
Call 800-233-5880 for information or see
www.upledger.com.

Ward Success Systems
Ultimatecoaching, with Dr. Charles Ward.  September 5-6, Woodcliff Lake, NJ; September 12-13, Seattle, WA; September 19-20, St. Paul, MN.  Call 925-855-1635 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.ultimatecoaching.com.

American  College of Addictionology & Compulsive Disorders
Certified Addictionologist Program Seminars, approved for CE by some boards.  Call 800-490-7714/305-535-8803 or email
[email protected] for dates and locations or see www.acacd.com.

Chiropractic Philosophy Roundtable
Dr. Ron Festa and Dr. Chris Lee.  Join for a night of fellowship and stimulating discussion on spreading the word of chiropractic family wellness care.  Seating is limited.  November 15, 2003, New Kensington, PA.  Call 724-335-5210 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.festachiropractic.com.

Realeyes Communications, Inc.
Wellness Cruise of Southern Caribbean, with Dr. Coren Lundquist and Parker Team members.  Seminars approved by Parker Chiropractic College for CEU’s.  February 28-March 6, 2004.  Call 1-888 737 3937 (1-888-RELEYES) for additional dates and locations or see
www.realeyes.com.

Electromedical Products International, Inc.  (Manufacturer of Alpha-Stim® microcurrent and cranial electrotherapy stimulators)
American Academy of Pain Management. September 3-7, 2003.  Call 1-800-FOR-PAIN (367-7246) for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.alpha-stim.com.

Koren Publications, Tedd Koren Patient Newsletter
Dr. Tedd Koren Seminars.  CE approved by Palmer and Life.  Call 800-537-3001 for additional dates and locations or see
www.korenpublications.com.

Lakeside Chiropractic Seminars
Winter:  The 10-Minute Ortho/Neuro Exam, with Dr. Jeffrey Miller, DC, DABCO, FACO, December 6-7, 2003.  Approved for CE through Logan College of Chiropractic.  Call 704-892-4966 for additional dates and locations, email
[email protected] or see www.DCseminars.com.

National Associations News Update

American Chiropractic Association
Dr. Harris Makes Major Contribution to National Chiropractic Legal Action Fund
Chiropractic philanthropist Dr. Bill Harris contributed $10,000 to the National Chiropractic Legal Action Fund (NCLAF) through his Foundation for the Advancement of Chiropractic Education.  Dr. Harris has, through the years, made numerous and substantial contributions to worthwhile chiropractic causes.  Dr. Harris viewed ACA’s “Simple Justice” film, featuring Dr. Carl S. Cleveland, III, at the Parker Seminar in January.  You too can view the film on ACA’s Web site at
http://www.acatoday.com/hot_topics/simplejustice.shtml.
NCLAF contributions may be sent to National Chiropractic Legal Action Fund, PO Box 75359, Baltimore, MD 21275.

Chiropractic in the Media
The much-anticipated June 2003 issue of Prevention magazine has arrived.  ACA arranged an interview this year between Prevention magazine and a chiropractic patient who was given her life back, thanks to chiropractic care.  Her story appears on page 85.  The article also provides ACA’s toll free number and tells readers to call the ACA to find a doctor of chiropractic near them.  Prospective patients have already begun calling us to locate ACA members in their communities.
An article in the July 2003 issue of Muscle & Fitness: Hers magazine titled, “Turn Your Back on Pain,” contains an informative quote from ACA national spokesperson Jerome McAndrews, DC, and offers a nice plug for chiropractic from the author of article.
Over the past month, ACA has also secured positive coverage for chiropractic in Natural Health magazine, Detroit News, and San Antonio Express-News.

International Chiropractors Association
ICA members elect new leadership team
The voting members of the International Chiropractors Association have chosen Dr. C. J. Mertz as the Association’s President for the next two years.  Dr. Mertz, from Dripping Springs, TX, becomes the 14th President of the ICA, an organization founded in 1926 by Dr. B.J. Palmer.  Dr. Fred H. Barge, was elected Vice President, and Dr. Christopher Quigley of Boston, MA, was elected ICA’s Secretary Treasurer.  The newly elected officers and Board members took office immediately upon the conclusion of the 2003 Annual Meeting.

Dr. Fred Barge passes on
The International Chiropractors Association was shocked and saddened to hear of the sudden death of one of their very dear leaders, Dr. Fred H. Barge, who passed away on Wednesday, July 2nd, of a sudden heart attack at his home in Onalaska, WI.  Dr. Barge was ICA’s president from 1988-91, served on the ICA Board of Directors for several years and, in May of this year, was reelected as Vice President by an overwhelming majority.
A legend in his own time, Dr. Barge was internationally recognized as a speaker, teacher, mentor, clinician and author.  One of chiropractic’s greatest philosophers, he is as often quoted as D.D. Palmer, B.J. Palmer and R.W. Stephenson.  A man of immense integrity, Fred will be remembered as much for his outspokenness as for his written words.  He was never afraid to speak his mind and he did so with courage and conviction.  He had a passion for chiropractic and believed implicitly in the power of the adjustment.
Taking his volunteer responsibilities seriously, Dr. Barge served on several of ICA’s Committees and played a key role in many of ICA’s successful programs.  The ICA’s very successful pediatrics program was started with his guidance and support; he helped launch ICA’s profession-wide newspaper, The Chiropractic Choice, serving as the Editorial Chair; he played a primary role in the success of both of ICA’s International Symposiums and, most recently, he was responsible for laying the groundwork for ICA’s newest Council on Chiropractic Philosophy, developing the syllabus for the Diplomate in Philosophical Standards of Chiropractic and putting together the profession’s landmark Conference on Chiropractic Philosophy held this past May in Kansas City, MO.
The ICA would like to hear from anyone who has any “thots” they want to share     about Fred.  Send your “thots” to
[email protected].  There can never be “enuf said” about Fred Barge.  Wherever he is, we are sure he is smiling.  We love you Fred and we will miss you.
 
World Chiropractic Alliance
WCA joins Coalition in support of HR 2560
The World Chiropractic Alliance has joined forces with other members of the Chiropractic Coalition—including  the ICA and FSCO—in support of “Chiropractic Medicare Freedom and Benefit Protection Act,” recently introduced in the House by Congressman Don Manzullo.
The bill, HR 2560, establishes chiropractic as a separate health profession under the Social Security Act, and clarifies the scope of chiropractic services that may be furnished under the Medicare program.  It states that chiropractors are the ONLY health care professionals qualified under that program to furnish those services.  This would prevent MD’s, DO’s, and physical therapists from providing, and being compensated for, chiropractic care.
For more information about the bill and how to help ensure its passage (including a sample letter of support to send to your Representatives),  visit the WCA website,
www.worldchiropracticalliance.org, or the Coalition website, www.chiropracticcoalition.org.

WCA Board passes resolution on intra-professional cooperation
The World Chiropractic Alliance (WCA) International Board of Governors (IBG), meeting during the annual WCA Summit in Washington, DC, re-confirmed the organization’s goal of working cooperatively with other chiropractic organizations whenever possible.
In a formal resolution that was enthusiastically endorsed by the Governors, the WCA stressed that it is “committed to intra-professional cooperation in advocating for the needs of the profession, and works with and encourages an open door toward all other chiropractic organizations.”